Agile, Experience Report, People, Project Management, Requirements

Agile Experience Reports – The Agile Dozen

My main purpose for this BLOG was to try and share some personal Agile Experience Reports and get discussions going with others on what worked and what didn’t work. My first challenge was to create a framework where some sense could be made of my personal project results.

When I compiled the list of Agile practices that I feel are important to projects, I was worried about how any patterns could emerge with that many factors. And I was right. I had compiled a list of 42 characteristics and practices that covered the Project Team, Project Planning, Execution, Requirement Gathering, and Development activities on the project.

What I did next was look at those 42 characteristics and practices and whittle it down to 5-10 Agile practices that I believe are really key to project success. Unfortunately, I could not get it below 12. So I was stuck with the Agile Dozen.

Next was the step to validate that those practices were indeed a true indication of project success. And through the projects reviewed so far, they have held.

For my upcoming Agile Experience Reports I’ll share how well we followed all 42 characteristics and practices on a rating scale of 1-5. But I want to caution that I am not viewing this rating as:

  • An Agile scorecard
  • An Agile Maturity
  • An Agile report card

I think those constructs cause teams to focus on the wrong things. Namely, getting a good grade rather than project success, client success, and continuous improvement. I created this framework to help myself understand what practices really contributed most to project and client success and help me to improve and focus on the right practices.

In the next BLOG post I’ll discuss in details the Agile Dozen and my rationale for including them. For now, here is the list of the Agile Dozen..

  • Team Experience (Technical & Domain)
  • Developer to Designer Ratio
  • Embedded Engaged Client
  • Team Continuity
  • Team Estimating
  • Automated Tests
  • Team meeting estimates
  • Daily stand ups
  • Retrospectives
  • Iterative Delivery
  • Epics, User Stories and Product Backlog
  • Continuous Integration

Then I’ll provide some context on where these characteristics existed and practices actually worked on projects and share lessons learned.

I hope you will find this interesting. I tried to find information like this when I was starting out and I could not find it very easily.

Re-posted from http://bornagainagilist.wordpress.com

About Terry Bunio

Terry Bunio has worked for Protegra for 14+ years because of the professionalism, people, and culture. Terry started as a software developer and found his technical calling in Data Architecture. Terry has helped to create Enterprise Operational Data Stores and Data Warehouses for the Financial and Insurance industries. Along the way Terry discovered that he enjoys helping to build teams, grow client trust and encourage individual career growth, completing project deliverables, and helping to guide solutions. It seems that some people like to call that Project Management. As a practical Data Modeller and Project Manager, Terry is known to challenge assumptions and strive to strike the balance between the theoretical and real world approaches for both Data Modelling and Agile. Terry considers himself a born again agilist as Agile implemented according to the Lean Principles has made him once again enjoy Software Development and believe in what can be accomplished. Terry is a fan of Agile implemented according to the Lean Principles, the Green Bay Packers, Winnipeg Jets, Operational Data Stores, 4th Normal Form, and asking why

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