Coaching, leadership, People, Project Management, Software Development, Team

Top 4 qualities for a leader/manager #agile #pmot

I’ve seen quite a few articles recently on the qualities to be a good leader, manager, and Project Manager. Most recently, I read an excellent article by Liza Wood on “Should you become a Manager?”. Highly recommended.

I thought I’d add my opinions to those already out there on what I feel are the top four qualities to be a leader or manager.

1) You are a competent team member already

I’m big fan of leaders and managers needing to be competent members of the team prior to expecting to lead or manage. If you are going to lead and manage people, I think you need to understand the issues your team is dealing with at a detailed level. I know not everyone agrees that this competency is required. I frequently see groups proposing that Software Development Project Managers don’t need to be technical. Let’s just say I must agree to disagree with those groups.

Although I think I’m an OK Project Manager for Software Development teams, I would never think I could be equally efficient managing a team of doctors or truck drivers. What do I know about those areas? How could I possibly help them in the issues they encounter.

2) You don’t want to make decisions for other team members and you don’t want to “manage” people

It is a red flag for me immediately when I hear someone say they want to manage. I wonder what their drivers are and whether they want to “manage” people due to the perceived status and traditional career path. Sometimes people will even confess that they want to be managers so they can make decisions.

I find the best managers are those team members that don’t want to manage. They also don’t want to make decisions for their team mates.

They grudgingly accept being a manager because:

  1. They are good at it
  2. They have the respect of their teammates
  3. They recognize it is probably the best way they can help the team and client

3) You enjoy working with clients and team members and helping to facilitate decisions

This point is connected to the previous item. Great leaders and managers love working with people and helping to facilitate decisions.

They love building relationships and helping people to grow in their careers.

Most importantly they love helping the team to solve problems by facilitating. They realize that the team must solve the problem and their role is to help the team build consensus as a group. Great managers always are careful to not offer solutions for the team. This would be the easy thing to do as the team is looking to the manager to make these decisions. But the really great leaders and managers will always defer to the team. (even though they have the preferred solution already decided in their head)

This deference to team decision-making can sometimes be perceived negatively by team members. I remember thinking this about one Project Manager I worked with. I thought that he wasn’t doing his job because he never decided anything, he always just deferred to us. Only in retrospect did I appreciate his masterful skill to facilitating team decisions.

4) You are always perceived as calm and professional and never blame anyone

Probably one of the most overlooked characteristics.

I feel that the job of a leader is to always build confidence in the team.

Great managers and leaders are always calm, never blame anyone, and just work the problem. Doesn’t matter how the problem arose – lets just resolve it.

And it never hurts to have a great sense of humour…

About Terry Bunio

Terry Bunio has worked for Protegra for 14+ years because of the professionalism, people, and culture. Terry started as a software developer and found his technical calling in Data Architecture. Terry has helped to create Enterprise Operational Data Stores and Data Warehouses for the Financial and Insurance industries. Along the way Terry discovered that he enjoys helping to build teams, grow client trust and encourage individual career growth, completing project deliverables, and helping to guide solutions. It seems that some people like to call that Project Management. As a practical Data Modeller and Project Manager, Terry is known to challenge assumptions and strive to strike the balance between the theoretical and real world approaches for both Data Modelling and Agile. Terry considers himself a born again agilist as Agile implemented according to the Lean Principles has made him once again enjoy Software Development and believe in what can be accomplished. Terry is a fan of Agile implemented according to the Lean Principles, the Green Bay Packers, Winnipeg Jets, Operational Data Stores, 4th Normal Form, and asking why

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Top 4 qualities for a leader/manager #agile #pmot

  1. Thanks for recommending my article! Regarding the need to be a competent team member first, I am ambivalent about how much of that is required. On one hand, managers or project managers who have NO technical background often has problems, since they don’t understand how the product is built or how to help resolve issues. On the other hand, being able to implement solutions in code alongside the team may be more detailed knowledge that what is needed, potentially resulting in the manager proposing solutions and making decisions for the team. In my experience, the best technical leaders/managers were done being hands-on technical, but still interested enough in the field to learn how things worked sufficiently to be a competent facilitator.

    Posted by Liza Wood | January 19, 2014, 1:47 pm

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  1. Pingback: New PM Articles for the Week of November 18 – 24 | The Practicing IT Project ManagerThe Practicing IT Project Manager - November 25, 2013

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